Author Archives: metaphysicalquilter@gmail.com

About metaphysicalquilter@gmail.com

Retired art teacher from Colorado. I have a Masters in Art. I am passionate about Studio Art Quilting, I love to read, golf and enjoy the life of my dreams!

Studio Redesign

My studio remodel is done. It took a little time, some elbow grease and a little under $1000 to create a wonderful dedicated work space.

Studio Collage
Plan

1. Start with the surfaces. I needed light that filled the space evenly. I painted all the walls with a white with a little sheen (not a flat white). Next I added a solid surface floor in off white. I used “peel and stick” tiles that have a linen texture. I keep the windows curtain free to let in the maximum natural light.

2.Place the biggest pieces of furniture in the room first. I have a large koala sewing table with a leaf extension. I can roll the table around but for the most part I like to use it with the leaf down. I placed this on one side of the room with my back facing the wall and the leaf facing middle of the room. This allows me to open the leaf without moving anything else. My mid arm machine is on the opposite wall. So is my desk and my storage cubby.

3. Tools and supplies should be easy to reach. Think of creating workstations. I have most of my thread near my mid arm machine.Rulers are pinned on a board above my sewing machine. Cutting matts sit on cabinets with my rotary cutters in cans in arm reach. I have my rack that hold my spoonflower prints, yardage and some finished quilts in the alcove right across from my buckets and bins of scrap.

4. Invest in quality functional storage. I had simple custom cabinets installed. They are a simple white finish. No doors or drawers. Two deep cabinets provide an extended  surface for quilting larger pieces. They also provide storage for all my batting and material. In the alcove I have large tall bookcase which holds all my media, books and miscellaneous materials.

 

Now Decorate!

Create displays of your work and work that you have collected. When someone comes to your studio you don’t want to miss an opportunity to have your style on display.

I want to be inspired when I enter my studio.  I pulled out work that is too old and too small to enter in shows. I created  interesting items like decoupage paint cans to hold trash and floor matts covered with fused scrap  . 


Don’t let money stop you from making your space work for you. Grab a can of paint, rearrange the furniture, create some workstations and put your work up on your walls.

Until Next time.....
Margaret

12 Little Secrets to Becoming an Art Quilter

Image from https://drbillsukala.com

I love Gretchen Rubin. Gretchen’s passion is the study of happiness and habit formation. On her webpage she has long list of “secrets to adulthood”  The secrets are little reminders that help make life more enjoyable and promote good habits.

I began more than 10 years ago working exclusively on art quilts. For past four years I have been increasingly successful. In the past two years my work has been included in over 20 exhibitions.

This year I received two cash awards.  I attribute my current success to consistent work time, setting clear goals, continued education and belonging to the premiere art quilt community - SAQA.

But when I started this journey, I began working blind. I didn't have very many quilting skills. I had no idea there was a professional art community focused on art quilting. I just saw an art quilt on a wall in my doctors office, picked up an issue of quilting arts and went home with an idea for a fabric collage.

 

 

So here are my 12 insights that I hope will help those starting this journey.

Start with small, easy to finish quilts.

Use materials you have and apply the skills you know.

Making a copy is not a crime, it’s a way to learn

Collect images that inspire you

Have a creative space in your home

Find a "tribe" of  people to help you grow as an artist

Visit museums and galleries

Expand your knowledge of composition

Make something that means something

Share what you make

Have a goal

Remember to Play!

The Careful Snapshot

Like many people, I am on a summer road trip.

My husband and I our heading back to our former home to see our son, visit friends, do a little sightseeing and attending the opening of “Art Quilt Legacies” in Ft. Collins Colorado.

San Antonio

While on the road, like many people; I  take photographs to post on social media. More importantly I am collecting images to potentially use in future projects.

One of my rules is to take the photograph when something captures my eye. I stop (and tell my husband to stop!). Before taking the photograph I remind myself this is a potential usable image.

My last few landscape quilts have been the product of what I call this “careful snapshot”.

To the left is a photograph I took with my cell phone on a trip to San Antonio last spring. It's my latest quilt.

A careful snapshot is a process that has provided me with a file of really exciting compositions for future projects.

Like most people I have a camera phone full of pictures from various trips, family gatherings, holidays, parties, etc... I download my image files periodically.  These photographs did not become art quilts until I changed my process.

First I am looking for a potential series of images.

Maybe it’s plants, a vista, trees, buildings, interesting graphics, still life, shadows  or water. My process is to find a variations on a theme.  My  first interesting image of the day inspires me to collect 5-8 more similar images.

I include more background than I think I want.

In college I was encouraged to compose with the camera. Of course that was in the days before digital images and photo manipulation software.

Today you can crop, adjust color, light and apply filters all on your phone. By including more background you allow yourself the flexibility to move your focal point or change the format (square, landscape, portrait).  

I don't "fix" the images right away.

Pictures in your camera that are potential projects do not need to be posted to social media. Distance measured in time and place helps artist to see potential.

At the end of the day, the next morning or sometimes when I return home, I flip through my picture file. I delete pictures that are duplicates or images that are obviously poor quality. Then I select my 3-5 to keep.

I send them as an email attachment to myself. By sending images as email I can pick them up of any computer as well as my iPad.

Now I have images that I can work with and start the process that is the first step in making one of my art quilts.

 

Another camera phone picture from the Alamo

Until next time......

Margaret

BIG Fish in Little Pond or Little Fish in BIG pond

I have been working the last three years on building a portfolio. My process has evolved through SAQA mentorship program, classes, critique groups, professional conferences, journals and my local community of quilters.

Along the way my perspective has changed. I think of this change as a shift from the kind of creative “pond” I am willing to drive into.

Main-Gallery

Once you have devoted the time and energy to making an art quilt you have to decide its’ purpose. Maybe it’s a valuable stepping stone to the next quilt. It may be just right for your home or as a gift.

There is also the possibility of sharing your work with a larger community.


There are two basic categories of display venues specifically for art quilts:

Traditional quilt shows where the quilt is judged on quality of craftsmanship and secondarily on the artist qualities.

Calls for Entry where judging is through the lense of  a visual art audience.   


Most local, county and state quilts shows have categories that accomodate art quilts.

The category may be pictorial,  surface design, non traditional, or some other "descriptive" title. The show usually lasts a week or less and lets participants pickup and drop off quilts which keeps the costs low. These shows may not require you to submit a digital image or may allow you to simply display your quilt. So if you want to dip your toe in the water, this is an ideal event.  

There are also major quilt shows that attract multi state participants.

Out here in the West there is “Road to California” .  American Quilters Society (AQS) has six quilt shows in the east and midwest. Paducah is a show that draws quilters all over the globe.

Quilts Inc. sponsors the largest quilt festival in Houston Texas: The International Quilt Festival. They also have large shows in Chicago and Kansas City.

The Festival of Quilts in Birmingham England is an opportunity to show off to a global audience. 

The second category of opportunities is a call for entry.

This is a request for quilt artists to display their work in an art venue. It may be a gallery or museum. These venues will display your quilt for a longer period of time and will likely attract people interested in art.

SAQA’s call for entry listing currently has 14 opportunities for regional, national and international exhibitions. These shows have a theme. Read the perspective carefully and see if there is something that speaks to you.

There are also venues that have annual or biannual shows like Sacred Threads. This exhibition is a great starting point for those who haven’t entered a quilt into a national competition.

Museums like Quilt Visions in San Diego California  who are dedicated to displaying artists making contemporary quilt art have opportunities for members including online exhibitions  as well as a couple of themed shows.

There are searchable databases that help you find a place to exhibit. My favorite is CAFE.  CAFE is a service for artists to upload images of their work and to search for calls for entry in your local area, your state and beyond. Best of all it's free. 

My advice is to:

  • Plan well in advance (6 months or more) to enter a quilt.
  • You will need a high quality digital image, a description of your materials and technique and an artist statement.
  • You will need to consider the fee for entry, costs of joining an organization and shipping.
  • Some computer skills are needed.  It’s not that hard, but planning and persistence are necessary. 
  • Be prepared to invest in an entry and not get into the first show you enter. 
  • Keep trying.

So what pond are you ready to dive into?

Until Next Time....
Margaret

On the Wall

FAVA

My quilt “Nan” was included in the long running and prestigious exhibition:

“Artist” as Quiltmaker XVIII” in Oberlin Ohio.   

The exhibition is very competitive and this year was juried by Emily Zilber; a curator at the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston. I received the Kirtz/Van Nortwick Award and an image of my quilt was used in the promotional poster.

The opening was May 12th and the show will run through July 29 2018.


Going to see art at exhibition is a learning opportunity

Seeing the actual art quilt on the wall allows me to to explore another artist’s technique and materials. By getting up close I can make an educated guess about the process. If I am lucky the artist is also attending the opening providing me a unique opportunity to listen to an artist talk about their own studio practice. I eavesdrop on other art quilters attending an opening. They always  have interesting insights into materials and construction.

Work that is presented in a gallery setting with good lighting and hung by professional gallery staff helps me to compare and contrast work in the same medium. I look at the scale of pieces presented, the genres (abstract, figurative, landscapes, conceptual, political, etc.) and level of technical mastery. Seeing which pieces were hung together as a small “collection” helps me see the visual connections from professionals point of view.

Unlike quilts shows, art quilts presented in a gallery setting are selected by a juror to present to an audience. The juror selects work that will “engage” an audience. As I tour the show I try to determine what drew the eye of juor to this quilt. I look  at overall composition and for quilts that are out of the ordinary.

As headed home, during a long day at a couple of airports, I read the catalogue. The catalogue includes a juror’s statement, a curator’s statement and statements from each artist. I read these carefully. Some artists in this exhibition used the statement to take me to another level of understanding of their submission and their larger body of work.

The last thing I look at are the photographs. There was a mixed bag of professional photographs and artist’s taking their own photographs. Each photograph was very high quality; however a photograph can never replace  see the actual work on the wall.


Until Next Time......
Margaret