The Artist

I am an art quilter exploring stories starting with a photograph.


Vintage photographs, family albums , snapshots and digital collages documenting my life are my primary subject matter.  

Every art quilt I make has a rich subtext - a hidden story.

Creating allows me, as an artist; to think deeply about my life and celebrate the joy I find everyday


cover portrait

My process starts with a digital image. I use photo manipulation software to enhance or create a new composition. The digital file is sent to a commercial fabric printer. When the fabric arrives in my studio, I use a variety of  materials including dyes, pigment sticks and paints directly on the cloth.  As I quilt through the cloth, batting and backing; I am  drawing with thread to create a rich and visually exciting  work of art.

Margaret Abramshe was born in Honolulu Hawaii in 1959 to family of academics. She studied for her BFA at the University of Colorado at Boulder, received a degree in Art Education from Florida International University and a Master’s in Fine Art from the University of Northern Colorado. She spent her career as public school educator, a mentor teacher, wrote numerous grants and was part of district wide curriculum writing teams in Jefferson County Colorado.

Since retiring, Margaret has devoted her time to being studio artist working as an art quilter.  In the past three years Margaret’s art quilts have been included in numerous local, national and international shows.

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Recent Posts

It’s Hot Down Here!

In Southern Utah the temperatures run in the triple digits for much of July and August. Although my husband and I escape for a week at a time to Colorado, we have to keep the lawn and garden alive, so when are at home we get out early and hibernate in the afternoon. 

 There is an upside to this season; studio time. I have been very productive this past two months. I have completed five larger quilts and am close to finishing my latest quilt of a pond in the Denver Botanic Gardens.

In addition to large quilts I am working on samples for two classes I am teaching in town. I love these little quilts. They remind me how important it is to understand design concepts and to be able to create a pleasing composition. The more samples I make, the more ideas I generate.


I was making a few still life arrangements when I found that folding small squares of prefused fabric I could cut freehand very whimsical petals and fuse these flowers to a grill matt from Costco. (Yes I happened to get 4 grill matts on sale and decided to try them instead of my small release sheet.) I ended up with a variety of these fun flowers to add to my still life.

Normally I would begin a composition a horizon like or something indicating the edge of a surface (like a table). This is a way to organize the composition and give the viewer a sense of space. After looking at Picasso’s cubist still life “Guitars”  I experimented with eliminating that horizon line and cutting up the background. The result was a more decorative composition.

Landscape 1

While creating some small landscape quilts I started looking at my collection of images on my Pinterest board “Art Quilt Landscapes”. One of my pins made me think of a visual problem:

What happens when you exclusively  use fabric with a stripe of strong directional pattern?

This is an easy way to create the illusion of space because the direction of the stripes lead the viewer’s eye into the composition.

I extended this idea of stripes by fusing together different fabrics The fabric below the horizon line were diagonal heading to a single vanishing point. Above the horizon line I took thin prefused fabrics and fused them into curvy lines across the sky. I add a few Van Gogh star shapes.

Looking at fine art, collecting ideas from other art quilters and using an understanding of design concepts produces a never ending stream of projects to create. It also helps to be sure to play and have fun! 

Until next time…….
Margaret

What’s wrong with this picture?

Do you ever look at a quilt you might put away that just doesn’t look finished? A quilt that didn’t make it into a show?  Maybe it’s a quilt that is sitting in your studio right now and you don’t know what to do next? Yesterday I attended a SAQA pod meeting. It’s a group […]

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My YouTube Channel

    Teaching gives the gift of deeper understanding of a subject to the teacher. As a person who spent her career in the classroom, I had been hesitant to start on that path again. People often ask me “Do you teach?” My reply has been that I am focused on my own work in […]

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Apply and Adapt

In my May post I described the wonderful week I had at the “Empty Spools Retreat”. In this post,  I am going to share with you how I applied what I learned and adapted that leaning to my own work. Sometimes people  are so impressed with a teacher or a quilt; they too fully embrace […]

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Invest in your Art: Empty Spools Retreat

I spent last week at “Empty Spools”, a quilt retreat located in Asilomar. Asilomar is a California State Park located just north of Pebble Beach. It is stunningly beautiful. The retreat lasts for five weeks and offers workshops in traditional and art quilting. Participants often return year after year with friends who make this more […]

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