Apply and Adapt

In my May post I described the wonderful week I had at the "Empty Spools Retreat". In this post,  I am going to share with you how I applied what I learned and adapted that leaning to my own work.

Sometimes people  are so impressed with a teacher or a quilt; they too fully embrace everything they learned in the workshop and make  a “duplicate” or at least a quilt that can easily identified with a specific artist. 

Although this often a necessary step on the road to creating your own unique style, it is best to apply what you learned and adapt that learning to fit your needs.


The class was given by Valerie Goodwin. One of the reasons I was drawn to the class was that her desired learning outcome for participants open ended.  

She described a process of using design thinking.


 

Map of a road through pebble beach. This was my final project which has an ocean waves, a road and homes under construction
Map of a road through pebble beach. This was my final project which has an ocean waves, a road and homes under construction

"An art quilter’s most valuable asset is his or her creativity — and it needs to be reinforced through an understanding of design thinking. In this workshop you’ll find creative thinking exercises. Beginning with an exercise related to the seven principles of design --work instinctively with color – explore creativity through experimentation."          course description

The products created in the workshop would  combine several techniques. The product was related to maps, but it was clear that the opportunity for creating your own spin on the idea was supported:

You will create paper map-like collage compositions through a series of quick "hands-on" exercises and subsequently make fabric constructions. The goal of this class is to allow you to create little spontaneous works that can become the basis for a final small quilted art map. You will develop these pieces using freehand scissor cutting, layering of varied fabrics, and other techniques to create an interesting work of art.

We started with simple paper compositions that would be an example of the each element and principle of design. Next we created postcard size compositions.These sketches required participants to build a composition on a woven substrate using a technique not unlike quilt as you go. Next we painted some areas, fused organza and finished with both hand and machine stitching. The compositions were loosely based on a map.

Post card sized maps.

In the final project we had a larger substrate. My final composition ended up being 22 x 16. We used the same process but that process to our own “maps”. Most participants created projects in the style of their instructor. Mine was a more abstract composition.

Valerie supported my decision to cut holes through the layers and to create three distinct zones which stretched the length of the composition. I think it came out pretty well.

More importantly when I approached my next quilt, I had an increased awareness of the power of design thinking.

“Sky Lanterns” is the result of apply and adapt. I used fused organza on the lanterns which lets some of the background color show through. When I created the image I focused on design concepts like movement, contrast and balance. I have no interest in creating maps but I do have a passion for creating art.


 

Until next time.....
Margaret